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2013

This report presents the results of a survey among Australians to determine their level of science literacy and how it has changed over the past three years.

2013

The Computer Science project is the first topic in the Academy's initiative to conduct science foresighting studies. These studies will consider the scientific potential for specific areas of study over the next few decades. Future science – computer science scopes future capacities and applications of high performance computing over the next 10-20 years. The project culminated with the production of a report in 2013. Planning is underway for further foresighting studies.

2013

The 21st century is a pivotal period in the ongoing human story. This is a tale that has been gathering momentum for centuries as we have made increasingly extensive and intensive use of our planet’s continents, islands and oceans to the extent that many parts of the Earth system are now showing the strain

2012

Nanotechnology presents amazing opportunities for Australia. When we consider materials at the nanoscale we can detect novel properties, and it is this novelty that makes nanotechnology research so exciting to researchers and is driving new technology and manufacturing opportunities in all areas of science.

2012

The Physics decadal plan 2012-2021: building on excellence in physics, underpinning Australia’s future was launched at the Shine Dome on 6 December 2012. It presents the Australian physics community’s strategic vision for the 10 years, from 2012–2021.

2012

The science of immunisation: questions and answers was prepared by a working group and oversight committee made up of Academy Fellows and other Australian scientists with internationally recognised expertise in immunology.

2012

Australia’s resources industry is based on large, high-quality deposits discovered in the late 19th Century and the 20th Century - an exploration endeavour that was supported by high-quality pre-competitive research that mapped the surface of Australia. While demand for Australian minerals remains strong, it is of serious concern that discovery of new deposits has not kept pace with depletion, despite ongoing competitive exploration efforts.

2012

Enrolment information in this report is based on data supplied by the Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and WorkplaceRelations (DEEWR). It was updated in January 2012 based on public statements made by DEEWR.

2011

Driven by science, the world is changing fast. More than a decade into the ‘Asian Century’, Australia increasingly seeks to improve its links with its Asian neighbors, while maintaining and strengthening links with North America and Europe. Since the beginning of the 21st century, global investment on R&D has almost doubled, speeding up the pace of change itself.

2011

Australian astronomy is riding a wave of discovery powered by new technology. This technology has increased the sensitivity of existing telescopes and enabled the construction of new telescopes that can see wider and further than ever before.

2010

The Earth's climate has changed. The global average surface temperature has increased over the past century and many other associated changes have been observed. The available evidence implies that greenhouse gas emissions from human activities are the main cause. It is expected that, if greenhouse gas emissions continue at business-as-usual rates, global temperatures will further increase significantly over the coming century and beyond. The science behind these statements is supported by extensive studies based on four main lines of evidence.

2010

The benefits of integrating Australia’s scientific endeavour with the efforts of the international scientific community are clear to Australian scientists. International collaboration invariably improves the quality and breadth of research. Increasingly, quality science is undertaken and underpinned by formal and informal international collaboration and networks.

2010

This precious and beautiful blue planet on which we live is complex beyond measure, so complex, we argue here, that a whole new science – an integrative science of the Earth system (Earth System Science or ESS) – is needed to understand it.

2010

As a contribution to exploring these challenges for Australia, Australia’s Renewable Energy Future presents a collation of the substance and conclusions of the 2008–09 lectures. It is our hope that this will inform a greater understanding of the state of renewable energy science and technology.

2009

This report was prepared by a working group of 16 Academy Fellows and other space science and Earth observation experts in response to the terms of reference assigned to the working group by the Presidents of the Australian Academy of Science (AAS) and the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering (ATSE) on 23 December 2008.

2009

Nanotechnology is already having a profound impact upon major industries worldwide, including at the very least electronics, computers, communications, defence, energy, biomedical, transport and manufacturing. Nanoscale science and technology is multidisciplinary, involving physicists, chemists, biologists, materials scientists, chemical, mechanical and electronics engineers and medical scientists.

2008

The supply of future clean energy supplies to meet ever-increasing requirements is one of the global challenges for the present generation. Worldwide energy needs are estimated by the International Energy Agency to increase by over 50% from 2004 to 2030 as populations increase and economies expand.

2007

In a world where information is only a click away, the competitiveness of nations such as Australia will be tested increasingly by a new world order. Developing nations including China and India understand with unquestioned certainty that inventive international science and technology are the keys to socioeconomic well-being and prosperity.

2006

Our modern world is undergoing change at a much greater rate than ever before. In a single lifetime a person might experience many technological changes that alter their life dramatically. Most of these changes are beneficial, but some are not — whether through accident or by deliberate intent. The level of risk in modern life is thus also greatly increased, and new patterns and parameters of risk require new strategies to address them.

2005

Science by nature is an international enterprise. Contributing to progress in science, developing excellence in Australian science, and maximising the benefits of science requires that Australia participates fully in this enterprise.