Honorific awards

Central to the purpose of the Academy is the recognition and support of outstanding contributions to the advancement of science. The honorific awards were established to recognise distinguished research in three categories: awards of medals and prizes are made to early-career scientists up to 10 years post PhD, mid-career scientists 8 to 15 years post PhD, and the prestigious career awards which are made to scientists for life-long achievement.

Most honorific awards are open to any scientist normally resident in Australia. Nominations may be made by anyone in the scientific community, with the exception of the Macfarlane Burnet or the Matthew Flinders Medals and Lectures for which nominations may only be made by Academy Fellows.

Criteria and nomination forms are available under each individual award. If a proposed candidate is already the recipient of an Academy early or mid-career honorific award, they will not be eligible for nomination for another early or mid-career honorific award. Council members can not be nominated for any of these awards during their Council term, except in the case of outgoing members of Council who may be nominated in their outgoing year for all awards except the Macfarlane Burnet and the Matthew Flinders Medals.

All nominations will be acknowledged. Nominations for 2017 Awards are now closed. Awards offered in 2018 will open for application and nomination in early 2017.

Browse through the awards by category below, or view the list of past recipients.

Early-career awards

Early-career honorific awards recognise outstanding contributions to the advancement of science by scientists up to 10 years post-PhD in the calendar year of nomination.

Mid-career awards

Mid-career honorific awards recognise outstanding contributions to the advancement of science by scientists 8-15 years post-PhD in the calendar year of nomination.

Career awards

The prestigious career honorific awards recognise life-long achievement in the outstanding contribution to the advancement of science.

© 2016 Australian Academy of Science

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