The WH Gladstones Population and Environment Fund

Status

The call for applications will open in February 2018.

Details

The W H Gladstones Population and Environment Fund was established in 2010 through generous donations from the late Dr William H Gladstones.

The W H Gladstones Population and Environment Fund offers support for empirical research into how the size, distribution, material aspirations and other characteristics of Australia’s population are likely to affect our environment—not only our land and landscape, but also social cohesion, health, the economy and defence. Population pressures in other countries which may have an impact on Australia could also be part of the research.

One grant is available for award every two years. A Grant is initially awarded for one year with the possibility of additional funding in the following year.

The Grant in 2017 will be $12,000 (GST exclusive). The renewed grant of $12,000 (GST exclusive) for 2018 will depend on the Academy of Science receiving a satisfactory progress report at the end of the first year.

This grant does not provide funds for bench fees, managerial, visa, insurance or infrastructure costs.

Focus of research

Research to be supported should aim to quantify various aspects of the human footprint, and to model likely ecological and other consequences.

Eligibility

Applicants should be employed in an Australian university or research institution and should have completed a PhD not more than 10 years ago. Persons engaged in research for a PhD may also be considered if their thesis topics are judged to be highly significant.

Exemptions for career interruptions may be sought from the Academy.  Reasons for exemption can include (but may not be limited to) illness, birth of a child or carer requirements.  To apply for an exemption, please include a short explanation stating the grounds for why an exemption is being sought and how long your research career was interrupted. 

Purpose of the grant

The purpose of the grant is to supplement the researcher’s existing resources and can be used for the purchase of such things as equipment, data, or the development of new measurement and analysis techniques.

Apply

Applications, in the form of a letter addressed to the ‘Selection Committee, W H Gladstones Population and Environment Fund’, should set out the objectives and methods of research to be undertaken, together with a budget outlining the proposed use of the Grant over the two years. This should be no more than 5 pages in length.

A short CV and a list of publications relevant to the research are also required.

Two referees’ reports should also be attached to the application. Referee reports should be addressed to the ‘Awards Committee’ and be no more than two pages in length and indicate the referees’ knowledge of the research and the researcher’s ability to carry out the project successfully.

Applications must be sent to awards@science.org.au. Late applications will not be considered.

Grants are offered to successful applicants in early November each year for projects to be carried out in the next year.

Applications are considered carefully against the selection criteria by a committee of scientists with diverse expertise. The decisions of the committee are based on the assessed competitiveness of the proposal. The Academy is not able to enter into discussion or correspondence regarding the reasons why an application is successful or not. 

The Australian Academy of Science encourages applications from female candidates and from candidates from a broad geographical distribution.

All enquiries to awards@science.org.au.

Past winners

  • 2017—Dr Dale Graeme Nimmo: Compact cities or sprawling suburbs? Optimal design of growing cities to conserve biodiversity.
  • 2015—Dr M Hadjikakou: Our ‘foodprint’ matter – Australian diets and their environmental, economical and health impacts.
  • 2013—Dr Isaac Santos: Do residential canal estate developments increase greenhouse gas emissions from Australian estuaries?
  • 2011—Dr Daniel Ramp: Engagement of a growing Australian population.

© 2017 Australian Academy of Science

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