Researchers gather to strengthen reproducibility in science

December 19, 2019
The Re:produce workshop included sessions designed to empower researchers to make their research more open, transparent and verifiable.

More than 60 early- and mid-career researchers (EMCRs) from across Australia met in Brisbane on 10–11 December 2019 to learn ways to strengthen reproducibility in science.

The lack of reproducibility of scientific claims has emerged as a hot topic in recent years, with the outcomes of some high-impact studies unable to be reproduced.

The Re:produce workshop, part of the Theo Murphy Initiative administered by the Academy, included sessions designed to empower researchers to make their research more open, transparent and verifiable.

The program featured topics such as open science, the statistical foundations of reproducible science, and open code and documentation tools. A panel discussed the challenges of increasing the reproducibility of research and how to overcome them.

Valuable insights

The Academy’s presence at the event included Fellow Professor Christine Beveridge from the University of Queensland, who welcomed attendees to the event. Professor Ginny Barbour, a member of the Academy’s National Committee for Data in Science, shared valuable insights with the attendees during the panel session and led a training session on open access.

The Re:produce workshop was the third event of this round of the Theo Murphy Initiative. The Theo Murphy Initiative (Australia) supports activities which provide tangible benefits to Australia’s EMCR community, with the overall goal of furthering scientific discovery.

Activities are managed by the Academy and funds are made available by the generous support of the Royal Society through the Theo Murphy (Australia) Fund.

More about the Theo Murphy Initiative

EMCRs at the Theo Murphy Initiative workshop explored how to address reproducibility in science.

© 2022 Australian Academy of Science

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