Contact Information

Event coordinator: Dr Sandra Gardam Phone: (02) 6201 9426 Email: emcr@science.org.au

13 September - September 15, 2017
FOR Public
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Add to Calendar 13/09/2017 5:00 PM 15/09/2017 5:00 PM Australia/Sydney The Antarctic frontier: developing research in an extreme environment

Antarctica represents a unique and powerful natural laboratory for science and international collaboration. Antarctic scientists are constantly forging new frontiers in understanding the drivers and feedbacks in the Earth’s climate systems, the evolution of the subglacial mountains and lakes, the adaptations and vulnerabilities of polar ecosystems, and even the origins of life, Earth and the universe.

The Antarctic Frontier symposium will bring together Australasian early- and mid-career researchers (EMCRs) from all fields relevant to Antarctic and Southern Ocean science. Over two days, EMCRs will share their latest research findings, build networks and create pathways for future interdisciplinary research. This symposium is an outstanding opportunity for EMCRs to take part in shaping the future of Antarctic science.

This meeting will focus broadly on eight themes, with both invited speakers and those chosen from the applications presenting their research. The Academy encourages applications from all early- and mid-career researchers with an interest in Antarctic science, irrespective of their field of research or professional appointment. Click on the link above to apply to attend and refer to eligibility criteria below.

Symposium themes

Antarctica as a window to Earth and the universe

Observations and measurements from Antarctica provide unique opportunities to investigate processes and phenomena that allow us to develop our understanding of the Earth and the universe beyond. These include solar–terrestrial interactions and space weather, the rotation of Earth’s inner core and the strength of its magnetic dipole, cosmic ray detection, and astronomy and astrophysics.

Human impacts in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean

Antarctica is globally recognised as having high conservation value and unique biodiversity. Humans have only been present in Antarctica for less than 200 years. Yet despite this, and the implementation of the Environmental Protocol of the Antarctic Treaty System, humans have impact. What impacts do human activities have on Antarctica? How are we impacting Antarctic biodiversity? How do we alter the ecosystem services provided by Antarctica? How can we effectively mitigate against human impacts? How can science inform non-native species management?

Ice and climate

Ice plays a critical role in climate as part of the way water is transported and distributed throughout the Earth system. It influences components such as global sea level, atmospheric and ocean temperatures and circulation, and surface albedo. For example, recent evidence suggests ocean warming is causing retreat of some parts of the Antarctic ice sheet, and sea level rise. This theme will focus on the drivers and outcomes of ice mass changes in the Southern Hemisphere. It will cover research focused on: How are ice shelves reacting to warming oceans and atmospheres? How does that impact ice sheet stability? Why is the extent of Antarctic sea ice expanding? What are the key thresholds for, and processes governing, ice loss in a warming world?

New technologies to tackle extreme conditions

The remoteness and harshness of much of the Antarctic environment means that automated systems are the only way to gather long-term data covering vast areas and all seasons. These include automatic observing systems (AWS, ocean moorings, ARGO floats and gliders), autonomous astronomical telescopes and observatories, robots (AUVs, drones) and satellite remote sensing. What new technologies are needed to resolve key uncertainties? What new technologies are on the horizon?

Southern Hemisphere atmospheric and oceanic circulation, weather and climate

The complex relationships between atmospheric and oceanic circulations largely contribute to weather patterns in the Southern Hemisphere, and ultimately our global climate. Through the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, the Southern Ocean connects the basins and currents of the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans, redistributing heat, gas and nutrients around the globe. Large uncertainties remain around how changes such as the warming and freshening of the surface ocean will affect global circulation, or how the increase in atmospheric anthropogenic gases will affect marine primary productivity. This theme will focus on Southern Ocean circulation chemistry and compositional changes, atmospheric changes, and interactions between them, as well as the impacts on Australia’s weather and climate.

Taking a step back: the environmental, climatological and evolutionary history of Antarctica

Climate change has been a critical aspect of Earth’s history, affecting diverse physical and biological processes. How did Antarctica’s environment and climate change in the past? What can Antarctic paleoclimatic research tell us about global climate trends? How has Antarctica’s unique terrestrial life been shaped by past climate cycles, and what can we learn from Antarctica about biological responses to climate change?

The Antarctic plate: solid Earth and tectonic perspectives

Antarctica contains some of the oldest known crust on Earth, built over billions of years. The breakup of Gondwana shaped the modern continent, leading to the opening of the Tasman and Drake gateways, the development of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, and paving the way for the modern ice sheet. Yet there is much to learn, as the Antarctic continent reveals less than 2% of its rugged subglacial topography and its submarine margins remain poorly explored. Today the solid Earth continues to impart significant forcings on the ice sheet and ocean circulation, which are not well captured in ice sheet and climate models. This theme includes new insights into the evolution of the Antarctic plate, including the deep lithosphere, geological architecture, tectonics, geothermal heat flux, basal hydrology, glacial isostatic adjustment and bathymetry.

Understanding and managing Southern Ocean ecosystems

The Southern Ocean is biologically rich. Despite strong ocean currents, however, biogeographic structure and cryptic diversity has been detected in many Southern Ocean species. How can we measure diversity and connectivity among regions, and how can we effectively manage biodiversity? How do we best protect this diversity?

Eligibility

Early- and mid-career researchers working in Australia or neighbouring countries, who have received their PhD within the last 15 years (excluding any periods of career interruption) are eligible to apply. If you identify as an EMCR, but do not fit this criteria, please explain this on the application form. Applications from PhD students within 6 months of submitting their thesis will also be considered. You must be a member of the to apply. It is free to be a member and you can sign up as part of your application if you are not currently a member.

Applications will be assessed by the organising committee, comprising scientists with diverse expertise who will select the successful delegates. Registration and accommodation costs for all successful delegates will be covered by the Theo Murphy (Australia) Fund.

The Australian Academy of Science is committed to supporting inclusion and accessibility. There are additional funds available to facilitate your attendance if you have special requirements or require additional support.

Hotel Grand Chancellor,1 Davey St Tasmania false DD/MM/YYYY

Contact Information

Event coordinator: Dr Sandra Gardam Phone: (02) 6201 9426 Email: emcr@science.org.au

5:00 PM September 13 - 5:00 PM September 15, 2017

The Antarctic frontier: developing research in an extreme environment

Program of events (PDF, 1.86MB)

Antarctica represents a unique and powerful natural laboratory for science and international collaboration. Antarctic scientists are constantly forging new frontiers in understanding the drivers and feedbacks in the Earth’s climate systems, the evolution of the subglacial mountains and lakes, the adaptations and vulnerabilities of polar ecosystems, and even the origins of life, Earth and the universe.

The Antarctic Frontier symposium will bring together Australasian early- and mid-career researchers (EMCRs) from all fields relevant to Antarctic and Southern Ocean science. Over two days, EMCRs will share their latest research findings, build networks and create pathways for future interdisciplinary research. This symposium is an outstanding opportunity for EMCRs to take part in shaping the future of Antarctic science.

This meeting will focus broadly on eight themes, with both invited speakers and those chosen from the applications presenting their research. The Academy encourages applications from all early- and mid-career researchers with an interest in Antarctic science, irrespective of their field of research or professional appointment. Click on the link above to apply to attend and refer to eligibility criteria below.

Symposium themes

Antarctica as a window to Earth and the universe

Observations and measurements from Antarctica provide unique opportunities to investigate processes and phenomena that allow us to develop our understanding of the Earth and the universe beyond. These include solar–terrestrial interactions and space weather, the rotation of Earth’s inner core and the strength of its magnetic dipole, cosmic ray detection, and astronomy and astrophysics.

Human impacts in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean

Antarctica is globally recognised as having high conservation value and unique biodiversity. Humans have only been present in Antarctica for less than 200 years. Yet despite this, and the implementation of the Environmental Protocol of the Antarctic Treaty System, humans have impact. What impacts do human activities have on Antarctica? How are we impacting Antarctic biodiversity? How do we alter the ecosystem services provided by Antarctica? How can we effectively mitigate against human impacts? How can science inform non-native species management?

Ice and climate

Ice plays a critical role in climate as part of the way water is transported and distributed throughout the Earth system. It influences components such as global sea level, atmospheric and ocean temperatures and circulation, and surface albedo. For example, recent evidence suggests ocean warming is causing retreat of some parts of the Antarctic ice sheet, and sea level rise. This theme will focus on the drivers and outcomes of ice mass changes in the Southern Hemisphere. It will cover research focused on: How are ice shelves reacting to warming oceans and atmospheres? How does that impact ice sheet stability? Why is the extent of Antarctic sea ice expanding? What are the key thresholds for, and processes governing, ice loss in a warming world?

New technologies to tackle extreme conditions

The remoteness and harshness of much of the Antarctic environment means that automated systems are the only way to gather long-term data covering vast areas and all seasons. These include automatic observing systems (AWS, ocean moorings, ARGO floats and gliders), autonomous astronomical telescopes and observatories, robots (AUVs, drones) and satellite remote sensing. What new technologies are needed to resolve key uncertainties? What new technologies are on the horizon?

Southern Hemisphere atmospheric and oceanic circulation, weather and climate

The complex relationships between atmospheric and oceanic circulations largely contribute to weather patterns in the Southern Hemisphere, and ultimately our global climate. Through the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, the Southern Ocean connects the basins and currents of the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans, redistributing heat, gas and nutrients around the globe. Large uncertainties remain around how changes such as the warming and freshening of the surface ocean will affect global circulation, or how the increase in atmospheric anthropogenic gases will affect marine primary productivity. This theme will focus on Southern Ocean circulation chemistry and compositional changes, atmospheric changes, and interactions between them, as well as the impacts on Australia’s weather and climate.

Taking a step back: the environmental, climatological and evolutionary history of Antarctica

Climate change has been a critical aspect of Earth’s history, affecting diverse physical and biological processes. How did Antarctica’s environment and climate change in the past? What can Antarctic paleoclimatic research tell us about global climate trends? How has Antarctica’s unique terrestrial life been shaped by past climate cycles, and what can we learn from Antarctica about biological responses to climate change?

The Antarctic plate: solid Earth and tectonic perspectives

Antarctica contains some of the oldest known crust on Earth, built over billions of years. The breakup of Gondwana shaped the modern continent, leading to the opening of the Tasman and Drake gateways, the development of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, and paving the way for the modern ice sheet. Yet there is much to learn, as the Antarctic continent reveals less than 2% of its rugged subglacial topography and its submarine margins remain poorly explored. Today the solid Earth continues to impart significant forcings on the ice sheet and ocean circulation, which are not well captured in ice sheet and climate models. This theme includes new insights into the evolution of the Antarctic plate, including the deep lithosphere, geological architecture, tectonics, geothermal heat flux, basal hydrology, glacial isostatic adjustment and bathymetry.

Understanding and managing Southern Ocean ecosystems

The Southern Ocean is biologically rich. Despite strong ocean currents, however, biogeographic structure and cryptic diversity has been detected in many Southern Ocean species. How can we measure diversity and connectivity among regions, and how can we effectively manage biodiversity? How do we best protect this diversity?

Eligibility

Early- and mid-career researchers working in Australia or neighbouring countries, who have received their PhD within the last 15 years (excluding any periods of career interruption) are eligible to apply. If you identify as an EMCR, but do not fit this criteria, please explain this on the application form. Applications from PhD students within 6 months of submitting their thesis will also be considered. You must be a member of the EMCR Forum to apply. It is free to be a member and you can sign up as part of your application if you are not currently a member.

Applications will be assessed by the organising committee, comprising scientists with diverse expertise who will select the successful delegates. Registration and accommodation costs for all successful delegates will be covered by the Theo Murphy (Australia) Fund.

The Australian Academy of Science is committed to supporting inclusion and accessibility. There are additional funds available to facilitate your attendance if you have special requirements or require additional support.

Hotel Grand Chancellor,1 Davey St Tasmania

© 2017 Australian Academy of Science

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