Contact Information

events@science.org.au

5:30 PM August 17, 2020
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Add to Calendar 17/08/2020 7:30 AM 17/08/2020 7:30 AM Australia/Sydney Innovations to save our oceans

What’s making waves in ocean science?

This (15-23 August 2020), dive in with our expert panel of scientists to find out the impact of the biggest problems that our oceans are facing, and how science can solve them.

Climate change and ocean warming, biodiversity loss and marine pollution are just some of the problems that plague our oceans today. And when our oceans are in bad health, it affects our whole planet.

That’s where our scientists come in. Their research paints us a picture of how and why things are going a bit fishy, and provides innovative solutions for healing our beloved big, blue ecosystems.

In this online event, you will hear from Academy Fellow Professor Ove Hoegh-Guldberg from the University of Queensland, Jemma Purandare from Griffith University and Dr Beth Fulton from CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere.

The panel will be hosted by Paul Richards, Director of Communications at the Australian Academy of Science. You’ll have the opportunity to ask your questions directly to our experts in an audience Q&A following the panel discussion.

to submerge yourself in an evening of enlightening ocean science.

This event is delivered in collaboration with .

About the speakers

Ove Hoegh-Guldberg is Professor of Marine Studies at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia and a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science. Over the past 10 years he was Founding Director of the Global Change Institute and is Deputy Director of the Centre for Excellence in Coral Reef Studies in Australia and Affiliated Professor in Tropical Marine Biology at the University of Copenhagen. Ove’s research focuses on the impacts of global change on marine ecosystems and is one of the most cited authors on climate change.

Jemma Purandare is a marine and coastal scientist with expertise in marine and coastal habitat ecology, impact assessment, monitoring, and restoration. Jemma’s work focuses on the impacts of human intervention in coastal and marine environments and the bridge between legislative commitment and achieving on-ground conservation outcomes. Jemma's work includes the impacts of development and landscape change on ecosystem dynamics, innovative marine and coastal ecosystem restoration, and the potential for natural coastal and marine systems and processes to be better utilised as a part of coastal adaptation and climate resilience. She has a particular interest in the role that ecological restoration of the marine and coastal environment can have in improving ecosystem services, particularly from the perspective of coastal protection and provision of living shorelines, and the ability of improved and adaptive policy to better achieve real results in conservation.

Dr Beth Fulton is an ecosystem modeller who leads the marine ecosystem modelling and risk assessment group based at CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere in Hobart. With a background in ecology, marine biology and mathematics she has concentrated on developing whole-of-system models. The models she has helped develop have provided insights for national and international bodies—providing decision support and understanding for regional marine planning, managing the impacts of fishing, supporting sustainable aquaculture and alternative livelihoods, as well as understanding and managing climate change. Dr Fulton is also an Adjunct Professor at the Centre for Marine Socioecology, University of Tasmania, where she supports students and collaborates on projects to find sustainable options for the ‘blue economy’ (the use of coastal and ocean systems).

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Contact Information

events@science.org.au

5:30 PM August 17, 2020

Innovations to save our oceans

What’s making waves in ocean science?

This National Science Week (15-23 August 2020), dive in with our expert panel of scientists to find out the impact of the biggest problems that our oceans are facing, and how science can solve them.

Climate change and ocean warming, biodiversity loss and marine pollution are just some of the problems that plague our oceans today. And when our oceans are in bad health, it affects our whole planet.

That’s where our scientists come in. Their research paints us a picture of how and why things are going a bit fishy, and provides innovative solutions for healing our beloved big, blue ecosystems.

In this online event, you will hear from Academy Fellow Professor Ove Hoegh-Guldberg from the University of Queensland, Jemma Purandare from Griffith University and Dr Beth Fulton from CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere.

The panel will be hosted by Paul Richards, Director of Communications at the Australian Academy of Science. You’ll have the opportunity to ask your questions directly to our experts in an audience Q&A following the panel discussion.

Register now to submerge yourself in an evening of enlightening ocean science.

This event is delivered in collaboration with Future Earth Australia.

About the speakers

Ove Hoegh-Guldberg is Professor of Marine Studies at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia and a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science. Over the past 10 years he was Founding Director of the Global Change Institute and is Deputy Director of the Centre for Excellence in Coral Reef Studies in Australia and Affiliated Professor in Tropical Marine Biology at the University of Copenhagen. Ove’s research focuses on the impacts of global change on marine ecosystems and is one of the most cited authors on climate change.

Jemma Purandare is a marine and coastal scientist with expertise in marine and coastal habitat ecology, impact assessment, monitoring, and restoration. Jemma’s work focuses on the impacts of human intervention in coastal and marine environments and the bridge between legislative commitment and achieving on-ground conservation outcomes. Jemma's work includes the impacts of development and landscape change on ecosystem dynamics, innovative marine and coastal ecosystem restoration, and the potential for natural coastal and marine systems and processes to be better utilised as a part of coastal adaptation and climate resilience. She has a particular interest in the role that ecological restoration of the marine and coastal environment can have in improving ecosystem services, particularly from the perspective of coastal protection and provision of living shorelines, and the ability of improved and adaptive policy to better achieve real results in conservation.

Dr Beth Fulton is an ecosystem modeller who leads the marine ecosystem modelling and risk assessment group based at CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere in Hobart. With a background in ecology, marine biology and mathematics she has concentrated on developing whole-of-system models. The models she has helped develop have provided insights for national and international bodies—providing decision support and understanding for regional marine planning, managing the impacts of fishing, supporting sustainable aquaculture and alternative livelihoods, as well as understanding and managing climate change. Dr Fulton is also an Adjunct Professor at the Centre for Marine Socioecology, University of Tasmania, where she supports students and collaborates on projects to find sustainable options for the ‘blue economy’ (the use of coastal and ocean systems).

© 2020 Australian Academy of Science

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