Contact Information

Name: Peter Hannaford
Email: Phannaford@swin.edu.au
Phone: (03) 9214 5164

2:30 PM November 09, 2014
FOR Public
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Add to Calendar 09/11/2014 2:30 PM 09/11/2014 2:30 PM Australia/Sydney Lloyd Rees Lecture 2014

How superconductivity has changed your life

Speaker: Dr Cathy Foley - CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering
Ian Wark Lecture Theatre
CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, Bayview Avenue Entrance, Clayton Victoria

Superconductivity has been around for more than 100 years. It was mostly thought of as a laboratory curiosity and yet this research area has won six Nobel Prizes in physics and has a very large number of scientists and engineers working in the research field.

Dr Cathy Foley will discuss the history of superconductivity, which only operates at either 'high' temperatures of minus 200 degrees Celsius (discovered 20 years ago) or 'low' temperatures of about minus 270 degrees Celsius (discovered 100 years ago).

Dr Foley will explain what superconductivity is, and what is understood (and what is not) about this exciting but baffling property that many materials possess when they are cooled down past a critical temperature. She will look at applications such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), mineral exploration, magnetoencephalography, transport and power distribution and superconductivity use in the development of fusion as a future energy source. Dr Foley will then look into the future to see where superconductivity will play a role in the modern world—including quantum computers and quantum teleportation—and ask whether superconductors that operate at room temperature (and do not need cooling) are possible./p>

CSIRO Materials Science & Engineering,Bayview Avenue Entrance Clayton Victoria false DD/MM/YYYY

Contact Information

Name: Peter Hannaford
Email: Phannaford@swin.edu.au
Phone: (03) 9214 5164

2:30 PM November 09, 2014

Lloyd Rees Lecture 2014

How superconductivity has changed your life

Speaker: Dr Cathy Foley - CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering
Ian Wark Lecture Theatre
CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, Bayview Avenue Entrance, Clayton Victoria

Superconductivity has been around for more than 100 years. It was mostly thought of as a laboratory curiosity and yet this research area has won six Nobel Prizes in physics and has a very large number of scientists and engineers working in the research field.

Dr Cathy Foley will discuss the history of superconductivity, which only operates at either 'high' temperatures of minus 200 degrees Celsius (discovered 20 years ago) or 'low' temperatures of about minus 270 degrees Celsius (discovered 100 years ago).

Dr Foley will explain what superconductivity is, and what is understood (and what is not) about this exciting but baffling property that many materials possess when they are cooled down past a critical temperature. She will look at applications such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), mineral exploration, magnetoencephalography, transport and power distribution and superconductivity use in the development of fusion as a future energy source. Dr Foley will then look into the future to see where superconductivity will play a role in the modern world—including quantum computers and quantum teleportation—and ask whether superconductors that operate at room temperature (and do not need cooling) are possible./p>

CSIRO Materials Science & Engineering,Bayview Avenue Entrance Clayton Victoria

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