Contact Information

Event Manager: Mitchell Piercey
Phone: (02) 6201 9462

4:30 PM November 05, 2014
FOR Public
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Add to Calendar 05/11/2014 4:30 PM 05/11/2014 4:30 PM Australia/Sydney Brain stimulation and autism spectrum disorder

About the speaker

Peter Enticott is Associate Professor of Psychology (Cognitive Neuroscience) in the School of Psychology at Deakin University, where he leads the Cognitive Neuroscience Unit. Peter completed his undergraduate studies in psychology at Deakin University in 2000, and his doctoral work in clinical experimental neuropsychology at Monash University in 2006. Before joining Deakin University in 2013, Peter was based at the Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, where he conducted a range of novel studies using non-invasive brain stimulation techniques to investigate autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This includes clinical trials assessing whether deep repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can improve social understanding in ASD. Peter is currently funded by a Career Development Fellowship from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), and holds additional grants from the Australian Research Council (ARC) and the Brain and Behaviour Research Foundation.

About the talk

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental condition that affects as many of 1% of all children. Despite an increasing prevalence we lack a solid understanding of the brain basis of ASD, and there are no specific biomedical treatments available. Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques have emerged as extremely useful techniques in the brain sciences. These techniques use magnetic and electrical fields to stimulate specific populations of brain cells, and offer new ways to investigate and change abnormal brain activity. I will discuss my own work in this area, which includes brain stimulation studies that offer a unique perspective on the neurobiological basis of autism. I will also discuss the results my group’s recent clinical trials using deep repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in autism, which have the potential to produce a first biomedical treatment for the core symptoms of ASD.

Shine Dome,9 Gordon Street Australian Capital Territory false DD/MM/YYYY

Contact Information

Event Manager: Mitchell Piercey
Phone: (02) 6201 9462

4:30 PM November 05, 2014

Brain stimulation and autism spectrum disorder

About the speaker

Peter Enticott is Associate Professor of Psychology (Cognitive Neuroscience) in the School of Psychology at Deakin University, where he leads the Cognitive Neuroscience Unit. Peter completed his undergraduate studies in psychology at Deakin University in 2000, and his doctoral work in clinical experimental neuropsychology at Monash University in 2006. Before joining Deakin University in 2013, Peter was based at the Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, where he conducted a range of novel studies using non-invasive brain stimulation techniques to investigate autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This includes clinical trials assessing whether deep repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can improve social understanding in ASD. Peter is currently funded by a Career Development Fellowship from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), and holds additional grants from the Australian Research Council (ARC) and the Brain and Behaviour Research Foundation.

About the talk

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental condition that affects as many of 1% of all children. Despite an increasing prevalence we lack a solid understanding of the brain basis of ASD, and there are no specific biomedical treatments available. Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques have emerged as extremely useful techniques in the brain sciences. These techniques use magnetic and electrical fields to stimulate specific populations of brain cells, and offer new ways to investigate and change abnormal brain activity. I will discuss my own work in this area, which includes brain stimulation studies that offer a unique perspective on the neurobiological basis of autism. I will also discuss the results my group’s recent clinical trials using deep repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in autism, which have the potential to produce a first biomedical treatment for the core symptoms of ASD.

Shine Dome,9 Gordon Street Australian Capital Territory

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