Contact Information

Dr Melissa Farnham

melissa.farnham@hri.org.au

12:30 PM February 19, 2019
FOR Public
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Add to Calendar 19/02/2019 12:30 PM 19/02/2019 12:30 PM Australia/Sydney Selby Fellowship—Novel insights into cardiovascular repair mechanisms: Targeting non-coding RNAs and epigenetics

About the talk

The interplay between cell types is critical to maintain organ homeostasis. In the heart, several distinct cell types control cardiac function after injury or during aging. This lecture will provide an overview on how endothelial cells control cardiac function during health and disease. Particularly, we showed that injury and aging change paracrine endothelial cell functions and augment the heterogeneity of these cells. Therapeutic approaches targeting endothelial cell functions to improve repair and regeneration will be presented.

About the Selby Fellowship

This lecture is one in a series of Selby Fellowship lectures by the 2018 recipient Professor Stefanie Dimmeler. Details of the series will be published on this website as dates and times are confirmed.

Fellowships are awarded to distinguished overseas scientists to visit Australia for public lecture or seminar tours, and to visit scientific centres in Australia.

The Selby Fellowship is financed through the generosity of the trustees of the .

About the speaker

Professor Stefanie Dimmeler received her undergraduate, graduate and PhD degrees from the University of Konstanz in Konstanz, Germany. She then completed a fellowship in experimental surgery at the University of Cologne and in molecular cardiology at the University of Frankfurt.

She is Professor of Experimental Medicine and Director of the Institute of Cardiovascular Regeneration, Centre for Molecular Medicine at the University of Frankfurt. Professor Dimmeler is author of more than 300 peer-reviewed papers, and has been invited as a speaker to more than 300 national and international meetings and seminars and has presented various keynote lectures. She has also received more than 15 national and international awards. Her research group explains the basic mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease and vessel growth.

Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney, New South Wales false DD/MM/YYYY

Contact Information

Dr Melissa Farnham

melissa.farnham@hri.org.au

12:30 PM February 19, 2019

Selby Fellowship—Novel insights into cardiovascular repair mechanisms: Targeting non-coding RNAs and epigenetics

About the talk

The interplay between cell types is critical to maintain organ homeostasis. In the heart, several distinct cell types control cardiac function after injury or during aging. This lecture will provide an overview on how endothelial cells control cardiac function during health and disease. Particularly, we showed that injury and aging change paracrine endothelial cell functions and augment the heterogeneity of these cells. Therapeutic approaches targeting endothelial cell functions to improve repair and regeneration will be presented.

About the Selby Fellowship

This lecture is one in a series of Selby Fellowship lectures by the 2018 recipient Professor Stefanie Dimmeler. Details of the series will be published on this website as dates and times are confirmed.

Fellowships are awarded to distinguished overseas scientists to visit Australia for public lecture or seminar tours, and to visit scientific centres in Australia.

The Selby Fellowship is financed through the generosity of the trustees of the Selby Scientific Foundation.

About the speaker

Professor Stefanie Dimmeler received her undergraduate, graduate and PhD degrees from the University of Konstanz in Konstanz, Germany. She then completed a fellowship in experimental surgery at the University of Cologne and in molecular cardiology at the University of Frankfurt.

She is Professor of Experimental Medicine and Director of the Institute of Cardiovascular Regeneration, Centre for Molecular Medicine at the University of Frankfurt. Professor Dimmeler is author of more than 300 peer-reviewed papers, and has been invited as a speaker to more than 300 national and international meetings and seminars and has presented various keynote lectures. She has also received more than 15 national and international awards. Her research group explains the basic mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease and vessel growth.

Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney, New South Wales

© 2019 Australian Academy of Science

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