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22 July - July 22, 2012
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Add to Calendar 22/07/2012 4:00 PM 22/07/2012 4:00 PM Australia/Sydney Healthy ageing: new approaches from genomics, stem cells and smart technologies

The Australian Academy of Science, in conjunction with the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering (ATSE) and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) organised the Ninth Annual Australia-China Symposium on Healthy Ageing: New Approaches from Genomics, Stem Cells and Smart Technologies. The event was arranged on behalf of the Australian Government Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education. The venue for the Symposium was the Shine Dome at the Australian Academy of Science, Canberra, ACT.

The Symposium comprised of 40 Australian and Chinese researchers, plus nine Australian early career researchers and was jointly opened by the President of CAS, Professor Chunli Bai, the President of the Australian Academy of Science, Professor Suzanne Cory and the Vice President of ATSE, Professor Mary O’Kane.

Professor Mary O'Kane (Vice President of ATSE), Professor Chunli Bai (President of CAS), and Professor Suzanne Cory (President of AAS)

At the symposium, Chinese and Australian researchers considered the burden of disease and presented new advances in infectious diseases, stem cells and regenerative medicine, genomics and personalised medicine, and medical bionics and nanotechnology.

Healthy ageing is a societal challenge common to both our economies. People around the world are living longer, and looking to have healthier, more active and independent lives while ageing. There is considerable potential for China and Australia to lead the region in providing innovative responses to this challenge and to reduce the economic and social burden on families, communities and nations.

This symposium lead to clearer understandings of the interests and capabilities of Australia and China in areas of healthy ageing. The conclusions reached by the participants provided a platform for enhancing collaboration between the two countries through innovative science, technological and engineering solutions.

The two-day symposium was followed by a day of site visits in Melbourne for the Chinese delegation at Stem Cells Australia, the Mental Health Research Institute, the Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute and the CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering Research Group.

(PDF, 7.06 MB)

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Contact Information

4:00 PM July 22, 2012

Healthy ageing: new approaches from genomics, stem cells and smart technologies

The Australian Academy of Science, in conjunction with the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering (ATSE) and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) organised the Ninth Annual Australia-China Symposium on Healthy Ageing: New Approaches from Genomics, Stem Cells and Smart Technologies. The event was arranged on behalf of the Australian Government Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education. The venue for the Symposium was the Shine Dome at the Australian Academy of Science, Canberra, ACT.

The Symposium comprised of 40 Australian and Chinese researchers, plus nine Australian early career researchers and was jointly opened by the President of CAS, Professor Chunli Bai, the President of the Australian Academy of Science, Professor Suzanne Cory and the Vice President of ATSE, Professor Mary O’Kane.

Professor Mary O'Kane (Vice President of ATSE), Professor Chunli Bai (President of CAS), and Professor Suzanne Cory (President of AAS)

At the symposium, Chinese and Australian researchers considered the burden of disease and presented new advances in infectious diseases, stem cells and regenerative medicine, genomics and personalised medicine, and medical bionics and nanotechnology.

Healthy ageing is a societal challenge common to both our economies. People around the world are living longer, and looking to have healthier, more active and independent lives while ageing. There is considerable potential for China and Australia to lead the region in providing innovative responses to this challenge and to reduce the economic and social burden on families, communities and nations.

This symposium lead to clearer understandings of the interests and capabilities of Australia and China in areas of healthy ageing. The conclusions reached by the participants provided a platform for enhancing collaboration between the two countries through innovative science, technological and engineering solutions.

The two-day symposium was followed by a day of site visits in Melbourne for the Chinese delegation at Stem Cells Australia, the Mental Health Research Institute, the Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute and the CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering Research Group.

Download program and abstracts (PDF, 7.06 MB)

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